Violin virtuoso part 2 – The Rivered Earth concludes

Posted by Liz

Continuing on from yesterday’s high quality performances, The Rivered Earth 3 was a spectacular, spine-tingling performance from Lawrence Wiliford, Philippe Honoré, Seventeen Voyces, Music and Beyond Festival Orchestra and the captivating young singers from Christ Church Cathedral Choir.

The Traveller tells the human story through transcriptions of sacred and secular Indian texts. The 4 ages of live – childhood, youth, adulthood and old age – were bracketed with Vikram Seth’s addition of the unborn and the dead. At the start of each chapter, a bell rang and Wiliford read a verse from the Rig Veda’s Hymn to Creation.

Right from the beginning the show was spellbinding, from the choristers and Honoré processing from the back of the church, to the children’s choir singing the nursery rhyme Ram Ram Shah – ‘woop’ glissandi included! Honoré had the treat of playing yet more excellent violin parts. The music mix was always interesting and varied from hot and angry to almost like a soundtrack; the tolling bell in ‘The Dead’ was very atmospheric.

The audience wasn’t the largest I’ve seen at Dominion-Chalmers but they were certainly amongst the loudest in applause and whooping!

The fourth and final instalment of The Rivered Earth was of a much more intimate nature. Two cycles based on the theme of The Seven Elements were performed in succession: the first, a song cycle for tenor and piano on the elements Earth, Air, Wood, Fire, Metal, Water and Space; the second a suite for violin and piano on the same elements but performed in a different order. All highly captivating and evocative; there were no introductions but the piano part (performed by Jean Desmarais) clearly brought to life each element, with excellent vocal performance by Isaiah Bell. The chord pattern in ‘Fire’ made me smile – in a small way it felt like an echo from a 1990s dance track!

The Seven Elements Suite for violin and piano, played by Desmarais and Honoré, was even more interesting and enchanting, conjuring up many mindscapes. According to my recollection, the Elements were performed in this order: Earth, Water, Wood, Air, Metal, Space, Fire. Again, I felt that this suite stepped almost into the indie-classical realm. The suite referenced the song cycle but with a different angle. For example ‘Water’ – in the song cycle the piano part sounded drippy and expansive, mimicking still water and the roar of a flood or waterfall. In the suite, ‘Water’ became smoother, more like a gurgling stream. Conversely, the themes for ‘Space’ were much more common across the two cycles. The violin parts were mostly simpler in sound than Ponticelli (Rivered Earth 2) but no less enthralling.

A short trio to finish – The Hermit on the Ice was fascinating and continued the mesmeric style of the concert, ending in a ‘repeat to fade’ motif on the piano.

All in all a wonderful concert cycle. The two CDs that currently exist would be excellent choices and I hope someone somewhere records The Traveller and The Seven Elements. Certainly with a bit of skillful marketing, Ponticelli and The Seven Elements Suite could easily appeal to fans of Amiina or Ólafur Arnalds.

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1 Comment

Filed under 2012 Festival

One response to “Violin virtuoso part 2 – The Rivered Earth concludes

  1. Hi Liz:

    It’s Bob here; the guy with the Kindle reader. We have met! Your blog is wonderful. Your comments are very interesting, timely and inciteful and an excellent addition to Richard Todd and others who write on the Festival events.

    And the format reads as well as any good news / mobile web site right there in the Church if I don’t have time to read before. I sure wish I had this address bookmarked before.

    Thanks so much.

    (edited for content)

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